Typically when partnering with a MSP, that organization will offer you a roadmap; this might be a one, three, or five year plan depending on your needs. This roadmap will have certain IT issues that may come up over time written into it, whether they be small issues or larger ones. That way there are no surprise expenses. With an individual IT employee, this luxury isn’t there. For instance you may at some point need to replace an entire server, which is a huge expense for your company. With a MSP, your roadmap will have a solution for this built into it. This is going to eliminate a lot of stress, headaches, and budget stretching on your part. All while saving you from the downtime that prevents you from running your business effectively, efficiently, and productively.
What did that say about cybercriminal understanding of the average MSP? That MSP is just like every other small business organization out there — a small victim with little capacity to pay out for ransomware recovery. This mantra began to change late last year as MSPs began to be leveraged as the initial infection vector of their larger clients. The Texas ransomware attacks were the first highly publicized examples that served as the catalyst, but certainly weren't the last.

In House—the process where an organization hires its own IT service providers and pays their salary, benefits, and further training, as well as the infrastructure they oversee. This is typically an extremely costly endeavor, and often businesses that try to procure in-house IT lack the capabilities to fully service their system as well as an inability to grow.
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